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it is obvious that mohammed morsi fully intends to create hard line islamist regime there as explained in the last 80 years of the group's history. somehow "the new york times" manages to find that moderate, unquote. jon: you're right, jim it is kirkpatrick, that's why you're so good keeping an eye on the media, including me. let's see what president obama had to say when hosni mubarak was in power listen to this. >> it is not the role of any other country to determine egypt's leaders, only the egyptian people can do that. what is clear, and what i indicated tonight to president hosni mubarak is my belief that an orderly transition must be meaningful, it must be peaceful, and it must begin now. jon: so, the president got his wish. hosni mubarak ended up leaving office and look at what we have. who is this guy, this muslim brotherhood member, alan? >> it wasn't up to president obama to change government in egypt. it didn't happen because of president obama it happened because of an arab spring and it happened organically because the people in egypt, which is the way it should happen, we
with former egyptian president hosni mubarak back in 2010. but mubarak is gone and president mohammed morsi is clearly playing a different and dangerous game. given the current situation protesters are storming the palace. more than a dozen dead. hundreds are injured. why on earth are we handing over 20 advanced fighter jets to a regime we don't exactly trust? we have a money power panel, mideast experts to explain. mike barrett, diligent consulting firm. judy miller from the manhattan institute. a fox news contributor. michael rubin, a resident scholar at the american enterprise institute. mike barrett, let me start with you. why are we doing this. >> i have a hard time explaining this. i've been on the show before and talked about it. in general giving some money to the military is a good idea because they're somewhat moderating force in egypt. giving more training, weapons, small arms, ammunition is one thing. 20 f-16s puts you in entirely different category. i'm frankly surprised they will do this. melissa: judy, i thought this had something to do with the deal that president morsi brok
to terror attack in benghazi. the "wall street journal" reports mohammed abu. many believe the leader of a new wing of al qaeda. meantime the secretary of state hillary clinton now agreeing to testify in benghazi attack in an open hearing. elena roth laytonnen says she with will testify before the end of the year but no date has been set. two australian shock jocks have been yanked off the air indefinitely after that prank involving kate middleton it took a tragic turn. a nurse at the hospital where the nurse was being treated was found dead on friday. she reportedly killed herself after all of this. she was duped by the dj's believing that the keep was on the phone for kate: kate william -- prince william and kate -- the supreme court could agreed to legal challenges ban on california's same sex marriage as well as the federal defense of marriage act. that act restricts federal benefits that gay couples can get by defining marriage as something that can only exist between a man and a woman. the court will hear both cases in march. 700-million-dollar power ball jackpot come forward.
constitution there. supporters of mohammed morsi each staged mass demonstrations in cairo throughout the day. in tahrir square security officials say masked gunmen fired on the protesters, wounded at least 9. after weeks of chaos there is word of possible talks tomorrow to try to calm the chaos. of course, this all started with president morsi sweeping power grab. the protesters forced him largely to give up those powers but he is still pushing ahead with plans for saturday's referendum. officials there say it's likely to happen despite some 90% of judges voting not to oversee it. greg palkot with the news live tonight in cairo. greg? >> demonstrations were big and noisy here tonight in cairo. got close it the presidential palace unlike last week when several people died, there were no clashes between the two sides tonight. maybe we're told because president morsi's muslim brotherhood we're told not to crack any heads this time. this unrest has left one economic casualty. egypt is deferring its request for much needed 5 billion-dollar loan from the imf. the government probably deciding this
out in tahrir square. also amassing supporters of president mohamed morsi and a controversial vote this weekend on a new constitution. today as you might imagine, tensions are very high as the political crisis threatens to ignite new conflicts. reza, what is happening now? >> reporter: ted, i don't think too many people want a repeat performance what have we saw last week, at the presidential palace where the two sides of the conflict met here and came to blows, nearly 700 people injured in clashes, several people killed. today the stage is set for another potentially violent and explosive day, because both these sides again have called for mass demonstrations within the next hour, opposition factions, critics of the president, have set out on marches that are going to culminate here at the presidential palace. in about 15, 20 minutes away from this location, that's where the muslim brotherhood, the supporters of the president, have called for their own demonstrations. i think a lot of people are relieved that these demonstrations aren't going to be at the same location but the pot
mohamed morsi, a scene of shooting earlier today. but the focus tonight, rick, is a few miles away from where we are right now, the presidential palace. anti--morsi protesters out there in big time. they've been trying to knock down a barrier made of rock and steel separating them and the palace, all the while supporters of morsi are gathering not too far away also in big numbers. there was a deadly clash between those two sides just one week ago. the fear is this could happen again. the difference, however, between now and then is that morsi in the interim has endowed the military here with stronger powers. they can intervene, maybe break up some violence. now, all the while this is all focused on that draft constitution which is planned for a vote, a referendum on saturday. the critics of morsi say that he's trying to rush it through. they say it's discriminatory towards segments of the population here, and they also say that his own style over the last couple weeks reminiscent of one other strong man we've seen here in egypt, mubarak. for his part morsi and his supporters say they we
mohammed resulted in the killing of bin laden? >> it did not, and that's what this study, that intensive study that the intelligence committee just completed thousands of pages and a yearlong study indicate clearly that they found out about the courier from an outside source that was outside the country. there is no information whatsoever that shows that. in fact, there's information that they misled the interrogators while this violation of the geneva conventions torturing people was going on. and they -- again, moral of the story is, if you inflict enough pain on someone, they will tell you anything they think that will make the pain stop. and that's what was happening in these interrogations, and it did not lead to eliminating osama bin laden, which a goal we all shared. and to tell the american people it did, i think, is really harmful. >> let me button it up with this, senator. with so many problems and issues on the plate of the senate right now, the attack on benghazi as we were just talking -- the consulate in benghazi, the fiscal cliff, what to do with syria just to name a few,
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)